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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put je'us on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without any at all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson become consumed with revising the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book 'ith? >> well, presumably it's not because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and paed a took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. heelieved jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesus, say no to christianity and say yes to yeast. >> how many of the colonists, what percentage were religiously affiliated or ha
>>> coming up, our special program looking ahead to the religion and ethics stories likely to make headlines in 2013. welcome. i'm bob abernethy and this is our look ahead at the top religion stories we expect to be covering in 2013. we do this with the help of kim lawton, managing editor of this program, kevin eckstrom, editor in chieff regionnews service, and e.j. dionne, a senior fellow at the brookings institution, a professor at georgetown university and a columnist for the washington post. welcome to you all. one of the big events of the new year will be the inauguration of barack obama to a second term, so we asked a wide variety of religion leaders what they hope for during the president's next term. >> if president obama would revert back to the, that young, powerful, firey spokesperson in the 2004 democratic national convention who talked about reconciling the blue and the red state, about the god of the blue state and the god of the red state that i believe that he has a chance to really emerge as a transformative catalytic president reconciling our nation. we are more p
according to st. luke." >> narrator: so began the building of a religion. now it is our turn, with the help of scholars and historians, theologians and archaeologists, to return to that time and use our best efforts to understand that story... of a man born in obscurity in whose name a faith was made. >> narrator: we know so little about him-- that he was born more than 2,000 years ago, and that he lived in palestine. we know he was baptized and became a preacher. and we know that he was publicly executed. >> ( dramatized ): what manner of man is this that even the winds and the seas obey him? >> narrator: with so little evidence to go by, archaeologists must sift the clues, and scholars decode the stories told by the first followers of jesus. >> the problem for any historian in trying to reconstruct the life of jesus is simply that we don't have sources that come from the actual time of jesus himself. >> the historian's task in understanding jesus and the jesus movement and early christianity is a lot like the archaeologist's task in excavating a tell. you peel back layer after layer after
, very polarizing charter, defines a lot of the basic human value like treatment woman of religion,reedom of expression, so i'm not sure that ts is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called lamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apa, standard andoor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty significant vi
the rooftops. and they're the perfect symbol for his multicultural city. >> love animals knows no religion or creed. this hobby is shared by kurds, turks, and arabs. >> from pierce said this to feats of light, no where else are people so passionate about pigeons as in turkey. >> that brings us to the end of this last edition of "european journal" in 2012. until next year, happy new year from all of us in brussels. bye for now. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
of the kind of movement and institutional religion that it would become a few hundred years later-- we will miss the flavor of those earliest years of the kind of crude and rough beginnings, the... the small enclaves trying to keep the memory alive. >> we're hampered by our vocabulary.? we know that this group will eventually form a gentile community, and they'll be known as christians. but this group didn't think that. this group expected jesus to return and establish the kingdom of god. >> he is a jewish messiah. they are followers of a jewish apocalyptic tradition. they are expecting the coming of the kingdom of god on earth. it's a jewish movement. >> the jewish sect, then, is a group which sees itself as jews, recognizes that there are other jews out there, but claims that those other jews out there have it all wrong. they don't fully understand what judaism is all about, and only the members of the sect do. >> sectarian groups are always in tension with their environment. that tension is manifested in a tendency to want to spread the message out, to hit the road and convince othe
wrote a book about the conflict and said it is as mu aut economic inequality as religion. she traces much today's problems back to ferdinand marcos. >> the government insiitute a lot of government policies that suppressed the muslim population. and after that, the military really violated human. >> reporter: that sowed the seeds for radicalization by some rebel fighters. by the 1990s a regional al qaeda affiliate began to thrive. >> to even help you understand why you're oppressed. >> reporter: are they growing? >> as far as we're concernedr: it's not growing. >> reporter: army major carlospe sole says they have largely been contained as a military threat in part helped by u.s. advisers who remain in the region. philippine officials also note that the peace treaty gives them more autonomy and control over resources. factions on either side remain unhappy with the peace process and there are frequent localized clashes, and trust continues to be in short ply. that's a void both the militaryy and the main rebel group the milf, say foreign civilians can fill effectively. >> only an armed
freedom of religion, freedom of expression, independence of the judiciary. so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. one of the most dangerous parts in that constitution, that it opened the door for many controversial school of religious thoughts to seep through the legislative process and undermine the authority of the judiciary. >> warner: the constitution was approved by 64% of the national vote, but only a third of eligible voters had turned out. and in major cities like cairo, majorities voted "no." this morning, those divisions were still apparent in cairo. >> ( translated ): it will certainly lead to stability. we can now begin to move forward. investment can begin to come into egypt. what more do people want? >> ( translated ): we are very sad and we never wanted the situation to be this way. we never wanted just one political group to rule. we wanted there to be uity. >> warner: for now, legislative power rests with the country's upper house of parliament, which is dominated by islamists. it was seated today. >> ( translated ): with regards >> warner: parliamen
even if they don't speak the same language, if they have different religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and ntroversial, politically speaking then the only thing that you can do is to leave. but 19 years are part of my best years in my musical career. so i said, you know, to explain exactly details what happened is impossible. and the newspapers generally made a mess of the entire story because they didn't know exactly the details. they thought that the orchestra was against me but this is not true. >> not true, absolutely not true. i ver had a fht witan orchestra in my life. but there were reasons outside of the artistic field that created a situation and we couldn't kmup kate any more. we had c
and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing, this this one case has sparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling o kd of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tried? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india becau it is a hu th would. here is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are you raped will you not get married. you could be thrown out of your village. so that is the most imp
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)